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PDP improves communication, understanding between all Airmen

An Airman reviews a Professional DynaMetric Program report Oct. 19 at Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman R. Michael Longoria)

An Airman reviews a Professional DynaMetric Program report Oct. 19 at Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman R. Michael Longoria)

GRAND FORKS AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. -- The 319th Air Refueling Wing is taking the lead on the Professional DynaMetric Program to help create a sense of belonging here.

The PDP is a management instrument that aids in developing better communication, understanding and mutual respect by providing a detailed description of an Airman's unique personality traits.

"By utilizing the PDP, we allow commanders and front line supervisors a chance to better understand all their Airmen and how each one adds unique personality traits to the 'Bring It Wing,'" said Col. John E. Michel, 319th Air Refueling Wing commander. "And it's these diverse personalities that make Grand Forks Air Force Base one of the most outstanding bases in the Air Force."

Grand Forks AFB is using the PDP ProScan, which is a survey sent out by e-mail. The survey generally takes less than three minutes to complete and within minutes the individual receives a 26-page profile report by e-mail. The ProScan survey identifies individual strengths, stress and satisfaction levels.

"Most people who read their own results are amazed by what can be identified through 60 simple responses," said Cheryl J. Anderson, Airman and Family Readiness Center. "However, the real value of the PDP ProScan comes from the two hour mentoring session scheduled by appointment afterward."

During the mentoring session, attendees learn more about their own basic personal style but also develop an understanding of the people around them and how their style impacts the way they interact both personally and professionally.

Mrs. Anderson added that the mentoring session also helps individuals identify pressures they may be experiencing and how those pressures are impacting their energy level.

Individuals who attend mentoring can develop an individual action plan to address how they are going to make identified changes.

"My favorite part of the PDP is the understanding I have of people whose strengths are quite different from mine," said Mrs. Anderson. "Instead of always communicating in a way that works for me, I have learned to communicate on their level and it ends up being a win, win situation for both of us."

Grand Forks AFB is currently the only base using the PDP; however, Colonel Michel is working to convince the Air Force and Air Mobility Command of its value.

"Grand Forks AFB is taking the lead on this because we saw a need, 'a broken wing,' as Colonel Michel first described it," said Mrs. Anderson.

This was identified by alcohol related behaviors, a high level of young Airmen being separated for failure to adapt and a lot of people seeking mental health type services.

The wing commander's goal is to develop an increased "Sense of Belonging" for everyone living or working on the base.

He has since briefed the PDP and other services and programs at the Air Mobility Command Community Action Information.