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JBC implements mobile medical screenings to keep missions flying

Still flying:  Joint Base Charleston implements mobile medical screenings to keep missions flying

Lt. Col. Natalie Riley, physician assistant with the 315th Aerospace Medicine Squadron, Briefs members of the 437th and 315th Airlift Wing about the new aircrew screening process March 23, 2020 at Joint Base Charleston, S.C. Aircrew members from both wings will now receive prevention education before each mission and will receive a COVID-19 medical screening upon return.   (U.S. Air Force photo / Lt. Col. Wayne Capps)

Still flying:  Joint Base Charleston implements mobile medical screenings to keep missions flying

As the COVID-19 pandemic sweeps through the U.S., Joint Base Charleston is able to keep their C-17 Globemaster III’s flying by implementing a medical screening process for aircrew members. Aircrew members from the 437th and 315th Airlift Wings will now receive prevention education before each mission and will receive a COVID-19 medical screening upon return.  In this photo is the medical screening tent that member of the 560th RED HORSE Squadron erected. (U.S. Air Force photo /Lt. Col. Wayne Capps)

RED HORSE sets up mobile medical screening tent

Members of the 560th Red Horse Squadron set up a mobile medical screening station. The medical screening station will be used to screen aircrew members from the 315th and 437th Airlift Wing before and after flying C-17 missions. The 315 AMDS personnel are setting up the mobile screening stations to ensure the safety of our aircrew members, Team Charleston family and the Charleston community.(U.S. Air Force photo / Lt. Col. Wayne Capps)

JOINT BASE CHARLESTON, S.C. --

As the COVID-19 pandemic sweeps through the U.S., Joint Base Charleston is able to keep their C-17 Globemaster III’s flying by implementing a medical screening process for aircrew members.

Aircrew members from the 437th and 315th Airlift Wings will now receive prevention education before each mission and will receive a COVID-19 medical screening upon return.  

“We set up a mobile screening tent near our flying squadrons,” said Lt. Col. Natalie Riley, physician assistant with the 315th Aerospace Medicine Squadron.  “When our crewmembers arrive for their pre-mission briefing, we spend time educating them in order to minimize the spread of the virus, and to focus on preparedness and prevention, based on CDC guidelines.” 

Each aircrew is also provided with a disinfectant and protective equipment kit.  The kits includes sanitizer, masks, gloves, thermometers, alcohol wipes and more.  

Also, according to Riley, the post-mission screening process is designed to identify potential symptoms of the COVID-19 virus before they are exposed to the base and community.  

“This is not just about just taking care of our aircrew members.  This is about taking care of our coworkers, families and the community that we live in,” said Col. Adam Willis, 315 AW commander.  “While most of the world is shut down, we still have a mission to do and we rely heavily on our aircrew members to carry out that mission.”

The screening process is being managed by the 315 AMDS and is outside of the normal medical screening received by Air Force aircrew members.  Willis added, “We saw a need and our reservists stepped up to make this happen for both wings.”