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GFLR 21-04: 19th AW’s continued accelerant for change

A group of people gather near a plane

A loadmaster assigned to the 61st Airlift Squadron directs loading operations on a C-130J Super Hercules during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 5, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah Miller)

Cargo is loaded onto a plane

Airmen from the 147th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron are instructed on how to load a MQ-9 Reaper coffin onto a C-130J Super Hercules at Ellington Field Joint Reserve Base, Texas, Feb. 5, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A person loads cargo

A loadmaster prepares a MQ-9 Reaper coffin to be loaded onto a C-130J Super Hercules during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Ellington Field Joint Reserve Base, Texas, Feb. 5, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A person instructs a group of people

A loadmaster from the 61st Airlift Squadron gives a safety briefing to Airmen from the 147th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Ellington Field Joint Reserve Base, Texas, Feb. 5, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A person walks cargo loading operations

A U.S. Army Soldier assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division watches loading operations on the flightline during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A person waits

A U.S. Army Soldier assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division waits on the flightline during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

Aircraft taxiing

Two loadmasters watch as a C-130J Super Hercules taxis the flightline during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A person operates a forklift

An Airman operates a forklift on the flightline during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A group of people walk on the flightline

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division walk on the flightline during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

An airplane taxis on the flightline
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A C-130J Super Hercules taxis on a dirt runway during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

An aircraft waits to takeoff
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A C-130J Super Hercules sits on the landing zone at Fort Polk, Louisiana during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A plane taxis on a runway
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A C-130J Super Hercules taxis on a dirt runway during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

An airplane taxis on the runway
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A C-130J Super Hercules taxis on a dirt runway during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A fighter flies overhead
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An F-15C Eagle assigned to 159th Fighter Wing of the Louisiana Air National Guard flies over Fort Polk, Louisiana during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A fighter flies overhead
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An F-15C Eagle assigned to 159th Fighter Wing of the Louisiana Air National Guard flies over Fort Polk, Louisiana during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Cargo loading operations
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Airmen assigned to the 19th Airlift Wing load cargo on to a C-130J Super Hercules during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

An airplane prepares for takeoff
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A C-130J Super Hercules taxis on the runway at Alexandria International Airport during Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

An airplane flies ahead
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A C-130J Super Hercules flies over Alexandria, Louisiana during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A pilot flies in formation
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Capt. Nathan Singer, 61st Airlift Squadron pilot, flies a C-130J Super Hercules over Alexandria, Louisiana during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A pilot flies in formation
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Capt. Nathan Singer, 61st Airlift Squadron pilot, flies a C-130J Super Hercules over Alexandria, Louisiana during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Soldiers board an airplane
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A U.S. Army Soldier assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division boards a C-130J Super Hercules during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Cargo loading operations
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A loadmaster assigned to the 61st Airlift Squadron directs loading operations on a C-130J Super Hercules during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Cargo loading operations
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A loadmaster assigned to the 61st Airlift Squadron directs loading operations on a C-130J Super Hercules during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A plane takes off
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A C-130J Super Hercules assigned to the 19th Airlift Wing takes-off from a dirt runway during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Soldiers board a plane
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U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division board a C-130J Super Hercules during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Cargo is offloaded
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A C-130J Super Hercules assigned to the 19th Airlift Wing performs a combat off-load during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A plane waits for takeoff
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A C-130J Super Hercules assigned to the 19th Airlift Wing taxis on a dirt runway during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A person evaluates the flight
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Capt. Trey Cecil, 34th Combat Training Squadron executive officer, serves as an observer, coach, trainer, or OCT, during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Pilots prepare for takeoff
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A C-130J Super Hercules aircrew prepares for takeoff during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

An plane prepares for takeoff
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A C-130J Super Hercules aircrew taxis on the flightline prior to takeoff during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Cargo loading operations
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A loadmaster assigned to the 61st Airlift Squadron directs cargo loading operations on-board a C-130J Super Hercules during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Pilots fly a plane
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Capt. Nathan Singer, 61st Airlift Squadron pilot, left, and, Capt. Tyler Newport, 61st Airlift Squadron pilot, right, fly a C-130J Super Hercules over Alexandria, Louisiana during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A person looks to take a photo
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1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto, 19th Airlift Wing chief of public affairs, documents flight operations over Alexandria, Louisiana during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (Courtesy photo)

A pilot flies a plane
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Capt. Nathan Singer, 61st Airlift Squadron pilot, flies a C-130J Super Hercules over Alexandria, Louisiana during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04, Feb. 3, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

A pilot performs checks
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Capt. Tyler Newport, 61st Airlift Squadron pilot, performs a pre-flight check on a C-130J Super Hercules prior to takeoff during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 3, 2021. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Jessica Cicchetto)

Cargo loading operations
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An Airman from the 321st Contingency Response Squadron ties down a HUMVEE in a C-130J Super Hercules during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 2, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

People are talking
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A pilot from the 61st Airlift Squadron speaks with simulated customs and border patrol officers during a Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) exercise on the flightline as part of Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 2, 2020. As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag-level exercise, GFLR offers unit participants a fluid training syllabus with each exercise tailored to meet unit specific requirements and certain major command designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

Cargo loading operations
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A loadmaster from the 61st Airlift Squadron directs a HUMVEE into a C-130J Super Hercules on the flightline during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 2, 2021. Green Flag Little Rock is planned and executed by the 34th Combat Training Squadron, who partners with U.S. Army Brigades, special operations forces, Air Force airlift and contingency response units, and international partners for training simulations staged out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Alexandria, and Fort Polk, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A plane
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A C-130J Super Hercules taxis on the flightline during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Alexandria International Airport, Louisiana, Feb. 2, 2021. The primary objective of GFLR is to support the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and provide the maximum number of airlift crews, mission planners and ground support elements to a simulated combat environment with emphasis on joint force integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A man stand's by a tree
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An Airman with the 61st Airlift Squadron participates in a Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) exercise for Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 6, 2021. The SERE exercise simulated a scenario in which the aircrew’s aircraft was downed in enemy territory. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah Miller)

A group of people in the woods
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Staff Sgt. Kenneth Paxson, 34th Combat Training Squadron Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) specialist, evaluates 61st Airlift Squadron aircrew members participating in a SERE exercise for Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 6, 2021. Throughout the exercise Paxson assessed the aircrew, providing instruction and aid. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah Miller)

A man applies face paint
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A loadmaster with the 61st Airlift Squadron applies paint to his face during a Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape exercise for Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 6, 2021. Loadmasters, pilots, Tactical Air Control Party members and SERE specialists all played a part in the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah Miller)

A group of people walk through the woods
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Aircrew members from the 61st Airlift Squadron participate in a Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) exercise as part of Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 6, 2021. The SERE exercise simulated a scenario in which the aircrew’s aircraft was downed in enemy territory. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah Miller)

A man crouches in the woods
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Staff Sgt. Kenneth Paxson, 34th Combat Training Squadron Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) specialist, surveys land tread by aircrew members during a SERE exercise during Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 6, 2021. Throughout the exercise Paxson evaluated the aircrew, providing instruction and aid. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah Miller)

A man walks through the woods
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Airman 1st Class Israel Gutierrez, 61st Airlift Squadron loadmaster, follows one of his wingmen in a Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) exercise for Green Flag Little Rock 21-04 at Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 6, 2021. The SERE exercise simulated a scenario in which the aircrew’s aircraft was downed in enemy territory. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah Miller)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. -- The 34th Combat Training Squadron held its latest iteration of Green Flag Little Rock at Alexandria International Airport and Fort Polk, Louisiana, Feb. 2-10, supporting the 82nd Airborne Division’s Joint Readiness Training Center rotation.

The joint exercise, dubbed GFLR 21-04, hosted participants from both the Air Force and Army.

As Air Mobility Command’s only joint-accredited flag level exercise, GFLR seeks to continuously challenge participants’ warfighting skills in emerging concepts of operations and provides real-world experience with partners they may not be able to get at home-station training.

In addition to providing airdrop and airland support to the 82nd AD, GFLR 21-04 featured the first wet-wing defuel of a C-130J Super Hercules within a GFLR exercise — honing the skillset of delivering fuel to use for operations at a forward operating base that does not have an established fuel storage facility.

GFLR 21-04 events also included Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) scenarios, F-15 Eagle integration, a Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) scenario and a sea rescue kit airdrop.

“We are able to give training to our aircrews with equipment that they don’t work with on a daily basis,” said Maj. Darin Boen, exercise director for GFLR 21-04. “The exercise also enabled them to have more experience with Joint users that they would work with and see downrange in a joint fight.”

A proponent of not only Joint integration but Total Force Integration, the 34th CTS also sought to expand the scope of the exercise by flying two C-130Js to Ellington Field Joint Reserve Base, Texas to train Texas Air National Guardsmen from the 147th Attack Wing on loading operations of an MQ-9 Reaper onto a C-130J.

With an ever-evolving and fluid training syllabus, the 34th CTS continues to incorporate training events that drive change and support the way the Air Force and Joint partners integrate together.

“We worked to incorporate components we do not typically work with to provide a more realistic and challenging crucible of training to the crews.” said Maj. Mathew Coffey, the mission commander for GFLR 21-04. “What we practice in GFLR often requires an aggressive pursuit; missions we need to do in order to see the operational changes necessary to continue to improve the C-130 enterprise.”

Boen said that GFLR continues to build Mobility Airmen’s confidence in expanded mission-sets that will meet tomorrow's national security challenges.

“For some scenarios, we might not have a full regulation that tells us how to do it, but we do our best at thinking through it and try to come up with the safest, most efficient way of accomplishing the task,” Boen said. “Whether it's Agile Combat Employment, wet wing defuels, or hauling cargo that we never hauled before, we strive to remain at the leading edge of operational excellence, able to accomplish any mission in the most efficient way possible.”