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AMC receives 2 prestigious safety awards

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Samuel Lansky, left, 60th Maintenance Squadron fuel systems technician, and Senior Airman Zachery Trafelet, 60th MXS fuel systems technician, inspect the fuel tank inside the wing of a C-5M Super Galaxy June 23, 2020, at Travis Air Force Base, California. The 60th MXS fuel shop maintains the fuel systems for all aircraft assigned to Travis AFB, home to the largest air mobility wing in the Air Force.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cameron Otte)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Samuel Lansky, left, 60th Maintenance Squadron fuel systems technician, and Senior Airman Zachery Trafelet, 60th MXS fuel systems technician, inspect the fuel tank inside the wing of a C-5M Super Galaxy June 23, 2020, at Travis Air Force Base, California. The 60th MXS fuel shop maintains the fuel systems for all aircraft assigned to Travis AFB, home to the largest air mobility wing in the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cameron Otte)

From left, Tara Pope, 97th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron C-17 Globemaster III crew chief, and Jennifer Cortez, 97th MXG C-17 aircraft attendant, conduct a check on the landing gear struts of a C-17, March 10, 2021, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. On a yearly basis, maintainers from all three airframes help support more than 5,000 sorties and 23,000 flying hours for the next generation of mobility Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Breanna Klemm)

From left, Tara Pope, 97th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron C-17 Globemaster III crew chief, and Jennifer Cortez, 97th MXG C-17 aircraft attendant, conduct a check on the landing gear struts of a C-17, March 10, 2021, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. On a yearly basis, maintainers from all three airframes help support more than 5,000 sorties and 23,000 flying hours for the next generation of mobility Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Breanna Klemm)

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. – Air Mobility Command recently received two awards recognizing the accomplishments of their 2020 safety program.

AMC captured the Secretary of the Air Force Safety Award for the third consecutive year and the Major General Benjamin D. Foulois Memorial Award for the second year in a row and nineteenth time in its history.

“We are incredibly honored to have earned these coveted safety awards,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Brandon Hileman, AMC chief of safety. “It’s truly a team effort and a testament to our outstanding air mobility warriors.”

The SAF Safety Award is the Air Force’s most prestigious safety award given to the major command, field command, direct reporting unit or field operating agency with the most effective overall safety program. Recipients of this award are approved by the Secretary of the Air Force.

“The many achievements of Air Mobility Command indicate strong support for safety at all levels of command personnel,” said John P. Roth, acting Secretary of the Air Force.

Since 1938, the Major General Benjamin D. Foulois Memorial Award recognizes the MAJCOM, field command, direct reporting unit or field operating agency with the most effective aviation safety program.

“Our safety programs save lives,” Hileman said. “People are our greatest asset, and AMC is doing everything we can to protect Airmen so they can continue to provide rapid global mobility.”

Air Mobility Command is recognized across the Air Force as a benchmark for proactive safety, according to Hileman. He cited the command’s risk management culture as the reason for extraordinarily low aviation Class A and Class B mishap rates, which have been 54 percent below the Air Force average since 2017.

The AMC safety programs also save the Air Force money.

“Mishaps can cost millions of dollars and result in destroyed aircraft or assets. Preserving these valuable resources equals combat capability,” said Hileman.

Unique to the command, AMC’s “Hindsight in 2020” Critical Days of Summer campaign leveraged lessons learned to recognize and avoid seasonal hazards, and successfully reduced lower level, Class C mishaps by 35 percent.

The command’s leadership role in the Airmen Safety Action Program, or ASAP, was another key component in the safety accolades. Airmen and civilians submitted 1,210 ASAP reports, and the AMC safety team worked with appropriate stakeholders across the enterprise to assess and resolve identified hazards.