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 Mobility air force aircraft fly nearly 65 percent of all aircraft missions on the daily Air Tasking Order in the U.S. CENTCOM AOR. This includes airdrop, airlift, aeromedical evacuation and air refueling missions in support of joint and coalition operations, including those for Operation Enduring Freedom and in the Horn Of Africa.
 
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Airdrops in Afghanistan
A cargo airdrop falls over Forward Operating Base Baylough, Afghanistan, during a delivery by a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III cargo aircraft to Red Tank, 1st Platoon, Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment on June 13, 2010. (U.S. Army Photo/Staff Sgt. William Tremblay)
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Record-setting airdrops sustain troops at forward operating bases

Posted 9/16/2010   Updated 9/16/2010 Email story   Print story

    


by Roger Drinnon
Air Mobility Command Public Affairs


9/16/2010 - SOUTHWEST ASIA  -- U.S. Air Force airlifters continue to set records for airdrops sustaining ground forces in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility with more than 3,800 Container Delivery System supply bundles delivered in August 2010.

Airdropped supplies are packaged in CDS bundles, which allow safe delivery by parachute. The new record for August surpasses the previous record of more than 3,600 bundles delivered to ground forces in July.

August airdrops averaged more than 99 tons per day -- about 6 million pounds for the month -- and included food, water, equipment and supplies needed by ground forces deployed to remote forward operating bases throughout the area of responsibility.

The Combined Air and Space Operations Center's Air Mobility Division plans, coordinates, tasks and executes the in-theater air mobility mission. As AMD director, Col. David Almand oversees the theater's essential air mobility operations, including the airdrops providing vital supplies and equipment to ground forces.

"These airdrops are critical to sustaining ground forces at austere locations where other means of re-supply aren't feasible," said Colonel Almand. "This continued sustainment of our warfighting forces is key to counter-insurgency operations, which require persistent presence and logistics."

The AMD ensures ground forces receive the supplies needed at the right time and place through constant communication with ground forces via air mobility liaisons. The AMD also coordinates airlift requirements with U.S.CENTCOM's Deployment and Distribution Operations Center and AMC's 618th Air Operations Center (Tanker Airlift Control Center) at Scott Air Force Base, Ill.

Through communication and planning, we're able to ensure our airdrop squadrons effectively accomplish their missions," said Maj. Sam Todd, AMD tactics chief. "We're also able to respond to the rapidly-changing dynamics of ground force operations."

Colonel Almand said even as airdrop squadrons support combat operations, the squadrons are also prepared to support Pakistan humanitarian relief missions, if needed.

Mobility air force aircraft fly nearly 65 percent of all aircraft missions on the daily Air Tasking Order in the U.S. CENTCOM AOR. This includes airdrop, airlift, aeromedical evacuation and air refueling missions in support of joint and coalition operations, including those for Operation Enduring Freedom and in the Horn Of Africa.



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