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  • Quotes from my mobility pilot granduncle’s war diary

    From Oprah Winfrey to Mark Zuckerberg, our nation’s most successful leaders are readers. Warren Buffet spends 80 percent of his day reading. Bill Gates reads 50 books per year. Former U.S. Secretary of Defense and retired Marine general James Mattis carried around a library of 6,000 books with him, everywhere he went. For those who feel they are too busy to read, take heed to the message this legendary general, sometimes referred to as “The Warrior Monk,” had for his troops: “The problem with being too busy to read is that you learn by experience, i.e. the hard way. By reading, you learn through others’ experiences, generally a better way to do business, especially in our line of work where the consequences of incompetence are so final.”
  • It's hurricane season - But why do you care?

    I know, I know … Preparing for an unlikely disaster seems like a fool’s errand. I thought the same thing – until October 2018. I was stationed at Tyndall AFB, and I was 10 days into my deployment when a ravenous Hurricane Michael (CAT-5) suddenly devoured my base and its neighboring cities, my friend’s and coworkers’ homes and all of my belongings in storage. As an Emergency Manager, I’m ashamed to say, I was not as prepared as I could have been, and I regret not taking one of nature’s most destructive forces more seriously. I urge you to not make the same mistake.
  • Let our core values be your Polaris

    Almost two years ago, I had the opportunity to visit the Air Force Academy with many of the leaders of 22nd Air Force where I found a beautiful base and campus full of rich history and traditions. One of the highlights was a tour of one of the newest buildings, Polaris Hall. Polaris (another name for the North Star) is a very modern building designed to foster collaborative, innovative problem solving with teams of airmen.
  • Equality; How do we get there?

    There’s been a lot of discussion lately on equality. In fact, I’ve engaged with several of you over the last few weeks discussing this topic, among many others. Equality is a word with many different meanings, depending on who you talk to. My belief is that equality gets to the point that we all are afforded the same rights and opportunities. How each one of us interprets equality depends greatly on a few things; our experiences, culture, and how we were raised. Equality is something that no one should have to earn or pay for. It should be a right that everyone enjoys. Throughout our history we have seen many good and bad examples of how equality has been provided, abused, and hijacked for many varied reasons. How do we ensure equality is guaranteed in our Force? Let me give you a few suggestions.
  • On integrity

    The Air Force places integrity first, because it is, without question, the most important of our core values. In its purest form, personal integrity is doing the right thing, because it is the right thing to do. Integrity serves as our moral compass, the basis for the trust imperative to military service. Without this foundational principle, nothing else we do really matters. Structural integrity is the ability of an item to hold together under a load, including its own weight, without breaking or deforming. A suspension bridge, such as the Delaware Memorial Bridge, includes anchorages, piers, towers and suspenders. Each component of the bridge is critical to its success. It takes all of the parts, acting as a whole, for the bridge to stand. Not only must they work together to maintain its form, but they must also be strong enough to stand up to the weight of their mission.
  • Independence and diversity

    Socrates said, “To find yourself, think for yourself.” To find oneself is to find one’s independence. Independence is our ability to make decisions and live life free from the control or influence of other people. This definition would suggest that independence can be an isolating concept, but in reality, independence can be a valuable and uniting force. For centuries, men and women from around the globe have joined to fight for their right to be valued, heard, respected and equal; to be recognized for their own individuality; and to be independent. Throughout our history and even in our Air Force today, many Airmen feel they have lost their individuality; that they are not seen, heard, valued or respected for who they are; and that they have lost their independence. So how do we fix this?
  • Flipping the 'switch' … Are you really there?

    Stress can and does extend from work to family time and vice versa. What sets people apart is how they approach and deal with this inevitable crossroad. For too long, I was constantly working through my to-do list from the time I got home each night until I fell asleep. While I was physically present for my spouse or friends, a lot of the time I was not fully engaged. I have the most loving wife who understands the stressors and expectations of my job. With that said, she rightly called me out when my mind drifted back to work when it should have been elsewhere. I take pride in the work I do for the Air Force Office of Special Investigations, and I love my wife and value our time together. I want to ensure both are taken care of. The only way to effectively do this is by flipping that “switch” at the right time.
  • Memorial Day: A Call to Remember

    For family and friends of service members killed in action, Memorial Day is a lifetime of heartache. It’s a constant whirring of what ifs.
  • Stay home - Empower lives

    DOVER AIR FORCE BASE, Del. -- “Stay home. Save lives.” These words blinked on the overhead traffic sign as I drove down what was usually a jammed highway. The eerie emptiness outside reminded me of one of those apocalyptic Hollywood movie scenes – You know, the one where the protagonist is desperately searching through the heart of a megacity for signs of a single human soul. But in my case, I knew my fellow Americans were all around me, hidden and huddled in their domiciles in an effort to #FlattenTheCurve
  • Choose kindness over fear

    On a Monday afternoon, I stood outside a grocery store with about 40 people. Many of us wore masks; some wore gloves.
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