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  • Faces of the Defender: Crew Chiefs

    Taking a risk and straying from a career comfort zone isn’t easy for some. The Air National Guard allows Airmen to be a part of new and unique career opportunities, and that’s just what this Airman did. Air Force Airman 1st Class Heidy M. Murcia-Alvares, a crew chief assigned to the 182nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron here, took a leap of faith when starting her Air Force career.
  • E & E bundle: Lifesaving supplies from skies above

    Whether trekking through hot, humid woodlands, an arid desert or traversing icy, frost-covered terrain, 34th Combat Training Squadron Airmen and other military personnel supporting Exercise Green Flag Little Rock train in realistic combat scenarios and multi-service environments.
  • Flight line lifeline: AGE supports total force combat airlift

    Stained cement floors appear under the base of a garage door as it’s raised so Airmen can pull a piece of machinery out of the hangar. Behind the large equipment tow, numerous individuals walk to and from stations disappearing occasionally to grab a tool or reach into the crevice to inspect equipment. Only the soft hum of power tools can be heard
  • A survivor’s story: colon cancer

    The taste of metal filled his mouth as an icy current numbed his fingers and toes. The chemotherapy machine hummed sharply beside the bed, draining the medicine into his blood stream to attack the sickness manifesting in his body. It was March 10, 2018, when Christopher Hicks was diagnosed with stage-three colon cancer.
  • MacDill provides wounded warriors unique treatment

    To minimize the impact of traumatic injuries, the Dermatology Office from the 6th Medical Group at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, offers a variety of unique treatments for those who suffer from scarring as a result of blast injuries, burns, amputations, and other surgeries.
  • 18th AF leadership talks spouse employment, license reciprocity

    Some aspects of being in the military can be hard on individuals and families. To gain better insight into the issues Airmen and their families face at McChord Field, Maj. Gen. Sam Barrett, 18th Air Force commander, and his wife, Kelly Barrett, visited Joint Base Lewis-McChord to learn what’s working, what isn’t and where they can help. “The issues that spouses face here are the same, for the most part, across the nation,” Kelly said. “There is education for children, access to health care, employment for spouses and license reciprocity. “Some spouses have careers that require a license to work in a certain state, and, if they PCS to a new one, it can take months and cost hundreds of dollars to become certified in that new state.”
  • 436th Logistics Readiness Squadron drives virtually to train Airmen

    The 436th Airlift Wing’s inaugural Squadron Innovation Fund invested in the training capabilities of the 436th Logistics Readiness Squadron as the 2019 SIF kicks off.
  • Airmen battle ice, snow to ensure readiness

    Low clouds and a light fog shroud the flightline as the Airmen wait indoors for their schedule for the day. It’s a brisk, cold morning promising ice on the aircrafts blanketed in the mist. For aircrews, ice or snow on their jet can prove to be a major hazard, and before they can fly, maintenance Airmen must deice the aircraft four hours before takeoff to help mitigate those hazards.
  • AMC command chief shares personal path to conquering life’s steepest mountains

    Chief Master Sgt. Terrence Greene walked toward his office desk, which blocked the corner of a third-story window overlooking Scott Air Force Base. As he moved, he waved his hands and talked about his plans to rearrange his new office at Air Mobility Command.
  • 375th MDSS team repairs life-saving equipment across 13 states

    Deep in the basement of the 375th Medical Group, behind a series of doors and out of the way of most hospital traffic, is a long, narrow room that looks like an old high-school “shop class.” Bits and pieces of broken defibrillators and other medical gear sit on workbenches, waiting to be fixed by 11 technicians who call the workshop home. The technicians who work here belong to the 375th Medical Support Squadron’s Medical Equipment Repair Center—commonly referred to as MERC. It is one of only a few centers scattered throughout the Air Force qualified to repair and maintain life-saving medical equipment.
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