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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Scott Phillips, the NCO in charge of maintenance and data collection assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron maintains radio equipment used to communicate with pilots at MacDill Air Force Base Fla., April 27, 2017. The equipment is used to help pilots communicate where and how best to land their aircraft. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Rito Smith) MacDill prepares for airfield systems, ground radar career merge
The merging of airfield systems technicians with ground radar technicians began when Staff. Sgt. Thomas Morris, airfield systems technician assigned to the 6th Operations Support Squadron went to a specialized training course.
0 6/12
2017
Eric Lambert, an automotive mechanic with the Army Support Activity Logistics Readiness Center, conducts an inspection of a vehicle in an engineering bay at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey, June 7, 2017. The LRC's mechanics and machinists are qualified to maintain and repair over 60 different vehicles ranging from light equipment to heavy equipment. Quiet professionals enable warfighters worldwide at JB MDL
JOINT BASE MCGUIRE-DIX-LAKEHURST, N. J. -- Through the front office door and down the hall, the room opens into an enormous bay. The mechanics turn wrenches and chatter. The Army Support Activity Logistics Readiness Center here is ensures the equipment warfighters depend on is reliable and ready for action at a moment’s notice. The LRC specialists
0 6/09
2017
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Oliver Broadbent, 22nd Airlift Squadron loadmaster, poses for a photo in front of a C-5M Super Galaxy June 6, 2017, at Travis Air Force Base, Calif. After overcoming Follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma, it took nine additional months to regain his qualification and flying status as an Air Force loadmaster. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Charles Rivezzo)  Back in the sky: loadmaster overcomes cancer with wingman, family
“It turns out you have a form of lymphoma,” said a voice over the phone. “It’s Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and luckily it’s only stage 1. You will be receiving a call from an oncologist sometime today.” This was the call Staff Sgt. Oliver Broadbent, a loadmaster from the 22nd Airlift Squadron, was expecting to receive since having a lump removed from his upper groin a week prior.
0 6/06
2017
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jerod Garcia, left, an inventory technician and Staff Sgt. Bernardo Ostalaza, the NCO in charge of central storage, both assigned to the 6th Logistics Readiness Squadron, load a KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft wheel and tire onto a rack, June, 1, 2017 at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. Supply Airmen help sustain aircraft parts that are required in the event an aircraft requires maintenance repairs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Adam R. Shanks) Birds don’t fly without supply
MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- Every day, Air Force aircraft maintainers repair and replace broken parts on their respective aircraft. Whether these parts are brand new or refurbished, they are required for maintainers to keeping planes in the air.The maintainers are responsible for understanding the ins and outs of aircraft maintenance, as well
0 6/02
2017
Staff Sgt. Amber Metts, 19th Aerospace Medicine Squadron Bioenvironmental NCO in charge, checks the pH level in a water sample May 18, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The purpose of the test is to make sure there are no harmful contaminants in the water. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols) Bioenvironmental Airmen ensure safe work conditions
LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. -- When illness prevention comes to mind, some people mayimagine doctors working in a lab searching for cures to formidable diseases. However,the 19th Aerospace Medicine Squadron Bioenvironmental Engineers are unsung scientists,chemists and microbiologists who specialize in identifying potential healthhazards in the
0 5/25
2017
Airmen with the 605th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron perform repairs on fire detection hardware in the tail engine of a KC-10 Extender. Many of the KC-10 here are experiencing faulty fire detectors due to the age of the aircraft. Maintainers preserve aging KC-10 fleet
JOINT BASE MCGUIRE-DIX-LAKEHURST, N.J. -- The KC-10 Extender took its first flight in 1980, and it’s no secret that the Air Force’s premiere refueling aircraft has reached a venerable age. But, the aircraft’s long and rigorous service has taken its toll and round-the-clock maintenance is required to keep them airborne. ]The dedicated maintainers
0 5/25
2017
Chief Master Sgt. Shawn Hughes, currently 22nd Air Refueling Wing command chief, hugs his son, Sean, in June 2013, at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. after his fini-flight. Hughes will retire June 1, 2017, after 30 years of service in the Air Force. (Courtesy photo) 30 years of service: mistakes made, lessons learned
A picture of him as a master sergeant hangs on the wall in his office, welcoming every Airman who walks through the door. To some it may seem as a decoration of self-importance, but if you ask him, he’ll tell you it holds a much different significance.“I have the picture there to remind me that I can’t think like a command chief,” said Chief Master
0 5/17
2017
Civil Air Patrol General Chuck Yeager Cadet Squadron cadets march in formation during a practice drill session in Brandon, Fla., May 8, 2017. The General Chuck Yeager Cadet Squadron consists of 49 cadets and 20 senior members, which consists of former military, actively serving military and civilians. (U.S. Air Force by Airman 1st Class Mariette Adams) Civil Air Patrol cadets awarded for excellence
As the sun slowly sets over the horizon, cadets of the General Chuck Yeager Cadet Squadron in Brandon, Florida line up in formation for drill. Sounds of their cadence carry. Hup, Twop, threep, fourp, column left… harch. They practice and practice, seeking perfection with every step.
0 5/15
2017
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class EJ Kevin Sto. Domingo, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, Travis Air Force Base, Calif., holds up the chief coin that was given to him by Chief Master Sgt. Shelina Frey, command chief Air Mobility Command, May 9, 2017. Frey was given the coin as an airman by a chief and vowed to pass it on when she recognized a young airman with leadership potential. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese) A coin forever links Airman, AMC command chief
It’s not every day you get an opportunity to make a favorable first impression on an Air Force leader. When individuals capitalize on these situations, a positive outcome is usually the result. For one Travis Airman, his first impression developed a bond that may pay it forward for generations to come.
0 5/11
2017
Pictured are the Harchaoui triplets (from left): Myriam, 436th Supply Chain Operations Squadron at Scott AFB; Rabah, 56th Security Forces Squadron at Luke AFB, Ariz.; and Warda, 60th Medical Operations Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif. All three were born in Algeria before immigrating to the United States, and are Airmen serving in today’s Air Force. Algerian triplets join Air Force for better future
SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. -- For one Algerian family, 6,600 miles was the distance between a life of struggle, promise and opportunity. Their journey has carried them over thousands of miles, from a barren region in Africa to California’s Simi Valley where eventually the Harchaoui triplets—Myriam, Rabah and Warda—would join the U.S. Air Force.
0 5/03
2017
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